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When these products first came out some years ago I thought I remembered that they ruined the tire. If I recall correctly? I was told that the tire was impossible to balance after that kind of product was used. This was supposedly true unless the inside of the tire was completely scraped out, which I would guess to be pretty labor intensive. Anyone have any experience with this kind of product?
 

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Good question. I am not familiar with these products and don't know if they are new and improved. Seems to me that a few years back if you used fix-a -flat it would be difficult to find a service center to work on your car. Something about threat of igniting combustable materials. Any help?
 

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The business next to mine does car repairs. They have told me MANY times that if I get a flat tire and use a Fix-A-Flat sealant to tell them before I have them look at the tire. If the tire is older it is sometimes less costly to buy a new tire than to have them go throught the correct cleaning process to get the sealant removed from the tire. They are believers that all of the sealant must be taken out or the tire will go out of balance again as the sealant starts to peel off of the inside surface of the tire. The lack of a spare tire is the only big gripe I have with my Solstice. I would have loved to have even a "donut" tire. The Fix-A-Flat system is okay as long as the puncture is small or the seal is not broken from the rim. Anything else and it is called wait for the tow truck.
 

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I am both cheap and lazy :lol: - and have used various forms of fix-a-flat on atleast two dozen tires. Not once have I had a balance problem with one of these tires.

As long as you drive the car while the sealant 'sets' - it will balance the tire itself. :yesnod:

It is true some formulations are flammable - but not all (which is why you are supposed to let the anyone working on the tire know).

I think a lot of the detractors of tire sealants :skep: are the same people that make a living selling new tires or pluggin/patching old ones.
 

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I am still waiting for someone that has used this stuff, but maybe it really does not matter? If your puncture experience is like mine you would never need the stuff. The tire problems that have occuured to me on my sportbike and cars have always been slow leakers that I noticed long after I ran over the object. I had plenty of time to get them to a tire shop before they went flat. I do wonder though if you get a puncture from something bigger than a screw or nail if this "liquid fix" is up to the task. If you have a bigger hole the tire maybe toast anyway? If it is a sidewall puncture tire shops won't fix that either so a new tire is in your future.
Since we a talking punctures, can someone do a math model on how a sheet metal screw or nail laying on its side can be run over, stood straight up, and driven into a tire? :( I find I am at most risk when I am on new tires.
 

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MAKsys said:
I am both cheap and lazy :lol: - and have used various forms of fix-a-flat on atleast two dozen tires. Not once have I had a balance problem with one of these tires.

As long as you drive the car while the sealant 'sets' - it will balance the tire itself. :yesnod:

It is true some formulations are flammable - but not all (which is why you are supposed to let the anyone working on the tire know).

I think a lot of the detractors of tire sealants :skep: are the same people that make a living selling new tires or pluggin/patching old ones.
:agree: I have taken them in and had them repaired for many years (we get a lot of punctures around here because of all the construction going on), and I have never had one that couldn't be repaired, and never had one with a balance problem. Also, I have watched them do the repairs and none of them have gone through any big procedure to get the sealant out. Sounds like uptight repair guys to me.
 

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Chip said:
Since we a talking punctures, can someone do a math model on how a sheet metal screw or nail laying on its side can be run over, stood straight up, and driven into a tire? :( I find I am at most risk when I am on new tires.
If you really want a graphic picture of how it works, go out and step on the end of a garden rake laying on the ground. You will geet the picture and a knot on your head. :lol:
 

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the main thing to remember is if you do see a nail or screw or whatever in your tire don't pull it out, Drive carefully and go to the tire repair place asap, and get them to remove it... more than likely it is helping to seal the hole and pulling it out will make it go flatter that much faster... Inspect your tires at least once a week and check all air pressure, you will be able to quickly tell when you are having a slow leak developing and you can look for a nail or something causing it.
most importantly if it is in the sidewall, replace the tire as soon as you can...never repair a side puncture.
 

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I think the older fix-a-flats in the can had propellent in them that made them dangerous for the repair guys.

Thought the newer stuff was more "slime" and had no propellent hence the reason we also have an inflator that plugs into the lighter socket for power.

I haven't looked at it in detail yet but think we have something like this in the Sol....
http://www.slime.com/smartspairs/index.php

Anyone?
 

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to answer the question on repair of tires comes the tire guy :)
fix a flat type sealants are good for one reason and that is to get you off the road,to properly repair a tire with fix a flat we hae to dismount tire,remove sealant and patch from inside of tire,we charge 25$ for a regular patch on 18" application,the surcharge for fix a flat is 10$
 

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Chip said: mine "have always been slow leakers."

My girlfriend has had quite a few nails in tires lately. I told her to stop cruising the construction sites!

.
 

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"If a Tire Goes Flat"

Owner's Manual, Page 5-59.

I recently assembled my power generator (due to Rita, saved the steaks in my freezer), and the tires were flat. I haven't gotten around to inflating them, since I had no compressor. Guess I'll give the Solstice compressor a trial run!

.
 

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4kids said:
to answer the question on repair of tires comes the tire guy :)
fix a flat type sealants are good for one reason and that is to get you off the road,to properly repair a tire with fix a flat we hae to dismount tire,remove sealant and patch from inside of tire,we charge 25$ for a regular patch on 18" application,the surcharge for fix a flat is 10$
Well, if you buy tires from companies like Discount tire, they do your repairs for free, regardless of the use of fix-a-flat, or not. they've even repaired OEM tires for me for $10, or sometimes for free. I've never had a problem with any of their repairs. On the other hand, I've been running a tire on my pickup repaired with sealant for a year and a half without getting it repaired! ;)
 

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BRSolstice06 said:
one problem I see if we do have the little air compressor is if you did not get the smokers package then you won't have a cigarette lighter ... and will have to install one ... no big problem .... just an observation. :)
But you do have the accessory outlet!! :)
 

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mceb said:
I think the older fix-a-flats in the can had propellent in them that made them dangerous for the repair guys.

Thought the newer stuff was more "slime" and had no propellent hence the reason we also have an inflator that plugs into the lighter socket for power.

I haven't looked at it in detail yet but think we have something like this in the Sol....
http://www.slime.com/smartspairs/index.php

Anyone?
I think you're right, mceb. Pull your inflator kit out and take a look at it.

The brand isn't slime, but the concept is pretty much the same.
 

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BRSolstice06 said:
one problem I see if we do have the little air compressor is if you did not get the smokers package then you won't have a cigarette lighter ... and will have to install one ... no big problem .... just an observation. :)
Not true.

All the smoker's package does is replace the power outlet with an outlet compatible with the lighter. You still have an outlet (one, and only one) with or without the smoker's package.
 

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Better yet

Here's a no goo process that I have used for years. No balance problems, no slime in tire. (Forget any kind of tire repair if it is in the sidewall; only fix holes in the tread).
Purchase a tire repair kit from any auto parts store (under $10) that includes:

(1) Rasp Tool

(1) Open-Eye Inserting Needle Tool

(4) Repair strips

(1) Tube of Cement

Pull the nail, screw, arrow, etc. from the tire.
Clean the hole with the rasp tool. Load the inserting tool with a folded repair strip coated with cement. Push into hole so that folded end is inside the tire and extra strip is still exposed on the outside. Remove the tool with a twist of the wrist to leave the strip in the tire. Reinflate and you're ready to go.
This is the same method a tire repair shop will use.
 

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autoengr said:
This is the same method a tire repair shop will use.
:agree:

I gotta get me one of those. Gives us another tool in the toolbox to fix and flat and as you say it's same process the tire people do anyway.
 
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