Pontiac Solstice Forum banner

1 - 20 of 30 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I love the tires, they look so awesome. I was wondering, what happens when I have to get new tires, where would I get the ones that look like that?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,206 Posts
I read in the car and driver article that the tire is a Goodyear Eagle RS-A,
We already know the size is P245/45R18. So you can get a look at the solstice tire at tirerack.com (if the search is working - I've had some trouble lately with it).
 

·
Mod Emeritus
Joined
·
7,468 Posts
tcl said:
Your wallet will weigh a lot less. :smile
Performance tires in that size range aren't inexpensive.
This is in fact the biggest negative of the car IMO. I know they went with the big 18’s for the look and performance, but that leaves some very expensive tire replacement bills for a car that is designed to be very affordable. Plus performance rubber tend not to last all that long, meaning more frequent replacement is necessary (especially if that performance rubber is driven in a sporting manner!)

It won’t stop me from getting one, but it does make the car less affordable to maintain for people who are on the fringe of buying one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,844 Posts
When the factory tires start getting bald, I plan on getting a set of 17" rims and tires. Price of rims should be partially off set by savings on less expensive tires. Before that set is worn out, I'll put the stock wheels back on and trade it in on the forced induction Solstice. Have a feeling I'll really be going through tires then! :thumbs
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,570 Posts
tcl said:
Your wallet will weigh a lot less. :smile
Performance tires in that size range aren't inexpensive.
This is why I'm hoping/wishing/dreaming about a wheel and tire option on the Solstice. Some of us are intending to use it for commuting. A little more tire and a little less wheel might be more ideal. A harder "daily use" compound for the tire might be nice too, but I doubt too many tire manufacturers make something like that in this size, as it is a performance size. Most the time people who go for really big rims and lo pro tires don't care how long they last, they just want awsome cornering, or that show car look. I might go for smaller wheel and tire at tire change time, I don't know yet.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,901 Posts
I think we've talked about the tire before and came to the conclusion that there is no spare tire. You get a can of flat-fix if we're lucky :D

If I end up autocrossing this car (which I would like to), I'm going to get a hitch and a sport trailer. The type that have room for a foot locker in essence and a tire rack. Get some light weight 16's with some slicks that I can change out at the track.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
Another issue with the tires is that someone (I think one of the magazines) mentioned that the car was "over tired". I think they were implying that it stuck so well it was hard to control the back end with the throttle, taking some of the fun out of it.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,901 Posts
Yeah, you can never stick too much. All it does it get rid of over steer if your car has good handling. Which the better the handling, the better the car. If you want fish-tailing go buy a Mustang.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
281 Posts
tcl said:
Another issue with the tires is that someone (I think one of the magazines) mentioned that the car was "over tired". I think they were implying that it stuck so well it was hard to control the back end with the throttle, taking some of the fun out of it.
sounds perfect!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
brentil said:
Yeah, you can never stick too much. All it does it get rid of over steer if your car has good handling. Which the better the handling, the better the car. If you want fish-tailing go buy a Mustang.
Tell that to the old Porsche 911 drivers who liked a car that would bite you if you drove it wrong. They took pride in being able to push the car to the edge without ending up going backwards.

But you're right in that most people probably prefer a car with neutral handling. My preference would be neutral or a slight tendency to oversteer. I don't like twitchy handling vehicles with lots of oversteer. I guess the point is that if the 245 series tires don't significantly increase handling over a narrower size, is it worth the extra rotational mass that the relatively low powered engine has to turn? Also, will the wide fronts make the steering feel heavy? My current and prior sports car had 225s on the front and 245s on the rear but had significantly more power and weight than the Solstice.

In any case, I just hope Pontiac chose that size after careful testing of the car's handling and steering characteristics rather than selecting the size with appearance being the major factor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
a) Think it was moi.
b) Was talking about *not* getting as much traction as possible because with too big a contact patch and street compounds you don't load the tire enough to "make it work".

With real racing tires the tread is so "sticky" that it take less pressure (per square inch) and so can get away with a wide tire on a light car. Street (DOT) legal tires are not built that way (would have a wear index around 15).

If you study the engineering of automotive suspensions (Costin & Phipps and Skip Scott both wrote good introductory books for race cars) you will find that proper loading of a tire *before* expecting maximum traction is essential and a lot of attention is paid to weight transfer (drag racers do too but just fore-aft and not side to side as in roundy-round or road racing).

If interesting that the current crop of FWD drag cars have to do the same but to *prevent* weight transfer.

Meanwhile back at the current rage for the wagon wheel look. Frankly I do not understand it because with an increase in diameter you also increase rotational inertia and ride height. Who knows, maybe the "underslung" chassis will return.

All of that said, for a given load on the tire (for autocrossing I just assumed that the entire front or rear GAWR would be on the outside tire & adjusted tire pressure by dividing the GAWR by the tire load rating and multiplying by the maximum tire pressure) there is an ideal contact patch and tire pressure for a given compound. 51 psi on the front of a '78 Sunbird seemed odd but it was beating Porsches. It also broke wheels (about 1 per weekend), shocks, shock towers, and suspension mounts.

Keep in mind that race tires are built completely different from street tires. A street tire has to consider all weather operation and wear and resistance to cuts. A street tire that loses 5-10 psi a week is not going to be very popular even if small compressors are more compact and affordable than they used to be.

So back at tires, if you look at a plot of vertical vs side loading you get a fairly linear increase with load to a "sweet spot" where the tire is working at its peak, then a sharp drop off as the tire breaks loose. Most people never realize that traction is also less than the peak on the front side also. I call this lower region the source of "unladen understeer" and is why you need to load the tire before expecting the maximum from it. "Late Brakeing" is one way to achieve this.

So static friction depends on where on the curve you begin. A light car with a big contact patch starts much further from the "sweet spot" than the same car with a smaller contact patch.

Now before about 1970, street tires were skinny and hard. In many cases you started out on the wrong side already. A great advance in Formula Vee racing occured when "zero roll stiffness" was discovered.

Today, big wide tires sell. At least the ultra short sidewalls prevents a lot of tire distortion at the expense of making rim width critical.

Now if all you want to do is to look good then the stock wheels/tires are fine (and if the rage continues will get cheaper, in 1990, 16 inch tires were very expensive but that moderated with time). But if your intent is to go fast around corners and through slaloms then a second set of wheels/tires of a more appropriate side (from a Cobalt maybe) would be in order.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
533 Posts
I found the "over-tired" reference I was mentioning. It was Automobile magazine June 2004. They said: "If anything, the car is over-tired, so dry-payment power oversteer is unlikely, but the tail will swing out faithfully in the wet".

They also said: "...corners with minimal understeer and roll, staying flat and neutral all the way through".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
DreamerDave said:
When the factory tires start getting bald, I plan on getting a set of 17" rims and tires. Price of rims should be partially off set by savings on less expensive tires. Before that set is worn out, I'll put the stock wheels back on and trade it in on the forced induction Solstice. Have a feeling I'll really be going through tires then! :thumbs
I might just get some 17's to. :smile
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
275 Posts
Before buying smaller rims, check the brake clearance. On a different forum it was found that upgrading a Reatta to late Aurora calipers and rotors meant that the stock wheels no longer cleared the rotors.

I *suspect* that the brakes will be off the shelf items from a different line (Cobalt ?) but will need to check.

BTW note that the "Automobile" quote said nothing about maximum cornering power, just the characteristics as the limit of the existing tires were met. Too much tire does lead to understeer.

(and just for S&G, I first wrote about unladen understeer in the 1972-73 timeframe).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I will not get 17's, I love the fact that the Solstice comes with 18's stock, it looks awesome and hopefully will handle great. Also, think about what will happen to your wheel well space if you go with 17's and stay low profile. Not only will your speedo be off but it wont look very attractive. You could go with a 225/55/17 and it should be close to the same overall diameter but then your cornering will get slopy. Those who try to save money by going 17 are nuts, how do you spend $1,200 on rims and $800 on tires and save money when you could have bought a set of 18 inch tires for $900. A quick search on tirerack shows that you can get a good set of Bridgestone Potenza RE050 tires for $201 each. Or even Michelin Pilot Sport's for $249. Thats not bad at all. If i switch rim's it will be with another set of 18's. Have you seen a 245/45/18, its a big tire! :smile
 
1 - 20 of 30 Posts
Top