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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Although I have worked on many cars in my day as a hobby, I must say that I have never seen a transmission mount or drive shaft as in the Kappa. A long and massive "bracket" secures the transmission to (of all places) the differential. There is NO traditional trans mount on this car. The flex joints are also beyond my wildest dreams, a CV up front and a "cush" drive in the rear.

Am I correct to assume that V8 swappers discard this "bracket"? It certainly will not fit a T56 Magnum or TR6060.:brentil:
 

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Although I have worked on many cars in my day as a hobby, I must say that I have never seen a transmission mount or drive shaft as in the Kappa. A long and massive "bracket" secures the transmission to (of all places) the differential. There is NO traditional trans mount on this car. The flex joints are also beyond my wildest dreams, a CV up front and a "cush" drive in the rear.

Am I correct to assume that V8 swappers discard this "bracket"? It certainly will not fit a T56 Magnum or TR6060.:brentil:
The automatics do have the "traditional" mount, you may be able to adapt that to your build. Only the manuals have the setup you're referring to.
 

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You're talking about the famous "Torque Arm". It was designed and introduced in later production on the manuals (somewhere in 2007, I believe) to tie the differential to the transmission and avoid torque bending between the two.
 

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Although I have worked on many cars in my day as a hobby, I must say that I have never seen a transmission mount or drive shaft as in the Kappa. A long and massive "bracket" secures the transmission to (of all places) the differential. There is NO traditional trans mount on this car. The flex joints are also beyond my wildest dreams, a CV up front and a "cush" drive in the rear.

Am I correct to assume that V8 swappers discard this "bracket"? It certainly will not fit a T56 Magnum or TR6060.:brentil:
I was just scratching my head this weekend about that same thing. I think my approach will be to just put blocks under the transmission to support it so I can remove all of the bolts and that bracket. I may just pull the engine and transmission out bolted together.
 

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I was just scratching my head this weekend about that same thing. I think my approach will be to just put blocks under the transmission to support it so I can remove all of the bolts and that bracket. I may just pull the engine and transmission out bolted together.

Make sure to measure the distance between the bottom of the transmission and the sides of the tunnel so you will know how much of an angle to put on the drive line when you put it back. Once you break loose the support the whole thing will drop down.
 

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Make sure to measure the distance between the bottom of the transmission and the sides of the tunnel so you will know how much of an angle to put on the drive line when you put it back. Once you break loose the support the whole thing will drop down.
It will be different since a TR6060 is going back in vice the AR5. I think DDM's mounting brackets will take care of the installation angle from how I interpret Dave's explanation.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
I finally found the GM part numbers for the pre-2008, non-torque arm, mount brackets.

They are GM #25806725 (stamped steel frame reinforcement) and a cast aluminum GM #10350592 that bolts to the side of the transmission.

Cars with the torque arm will have an M14x2x35 bolt, in the welded frame bracket, to prevent rattle from a loose captured nut in it. To attach the assembly, an M14x2x130 will be needed. At least this is what I can surmise from a less than clear parts search. The bolts that secure the reinforcement bracket to the frame are not described in the catalogue. Part numbers for these are: M14 GM #11519079 and other (2 required) GM #11515776.

Getting the torque bracket out was a bitch. The driver's side rear caliper, and knuckle have to be removed, along with the axle (which can remain bolted to the hub). This provides room to slide the differential to the left, drop it some, and remove the torque bracket. The drive shaft is captured at both ends and WILL NOT drop w/o increasing the distance between the transmission and differential. Even though I am also removing the motor, the torque bracket had to come out first because it captures the rear of the transmission housing, preventing the tilting of the motor. This is clearly seen in the picture posted by TomatoSoup.

In all my days as a hobby mechanic, I have never seen a CV joint coupling at the transmission and a rubber "donut" coupling at the differential. This coupling has a 2 inch pin keeping the diff/shaft aligned, reason a good bit of clearance needs to be added between front and rear to remove it. At the trans side, there is NO slip yoke. The CV joint is captured in a steel housing that will NOT allow it to come out perpendicularly to the axis or rotation, as every other DS I ever worked on.
 

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Per your PM. Non-torque arm assembly image below.

These parts and images are all available at Nalley GMC: parts.nalley.com Just plug in your car (or earlier model year in this case) and search away. Or if you already have a part number, plug that in to the search field directly :)

 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Thanks for the picture TS. It shows the stamped steel reinforcement bracket. There is another view that shows the aluminum bracket that fits on the side of the differential and that can be partially seen on this view. Let me try your link.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 · (Edited)


This is an earlier diff bracket (item 12) that uses the cast-in loop on the diff housing. It has the same 10350592 part number but I am going to guess it is gone for good and if you order the part number you will get the bracket that bolts to the side of the diff as in the picture above. On Monday I will be ordering both of the brackets and associated bolts. I will report what happens. All these parts are obsolete and "no longer available". This is what I have been told by GM dealers. I have a 1996 Nissan 300zx and can get most things for it still. This car is not even 10 years old. WTF?
 

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All these parts are obsolete and "no longer available". This is what I have been told by GM dealers. I have a 1996 Nissan 300zx and can get most things for it still. This car is not even 10 years old. WTF?
You have a discontinued car from a manufacturer that no longer exists. Once the parts are gone, you are SOL on those parts for your Sol(stice).
 

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Getting the torque bracket out was a bitch. The driver's side rear caliper, and knuckle have to be removed, along with the axle (which can remain bolted to the hub). This provides room to slide the differential to the left, drop it some, and remove the torque bracket. The drive shaft is captured at both ends and WILL NOT drop w/o increasing the distance between the transmission and differential. Even though I am also removing the motor, the torque bracket had to come out first because it captures the rear of the transmission housing, preventing the tilting of the motor. This is clearly seen in the picture posted by TomatoSoup.
I was able to get the driveshaft out without removing the torque arm. It did require a little bit of convincing with a flat head screwdriver though. I still have not removed the torque arm because I only lowered the rear diff thinking that would be sufficient (it wasn't). Now I know that I need to remove the left rear caliper, knuckle, along with the axle. I am ready to pull the engine/ transmission though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
Be careful forcing the drive out. The rubber dunut at rear on the differential end, requires centering for the DS to spin true. This is provided by a pin that sticks out from the center of the diff' "tripod". If that gets bent by forcing the DS out; there will be trouble. A lot of leverage can be applied at that pin, when angling a 4 foot long shaft at the trans coupler. That pin is monolithic with the pinon (see pictures above). Having to deal with that would not be a trivial matter. Hope you are all right.
 

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Item 18 or 19 (depending on which picture you're looking at)? Yeah, I think I'm good. It looks straight to me. I'd post a picture, but I hate the round about way the Solstice forum makes you post pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Correct. If you spin a wheel while looking at the "tripod", it will be clear if the pin is running true or not. That mini shaft is about 1/2 inch in diameter and not likely easily bent. As mentioned elsewhere on this forum (I think in a clutch related post), the FSM insists, the procedure to do a clutch and remove the transmission) begins by removing the let axle and diff. Unorthodox to say the least. A bitch to say some more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I need to make a clarification. The early style diff bracket (the one that fits in the loop) is part #10350592. This was for 2006. The later style bracket is part #15922410. A casting boss was added to the top of the loop when the later style bracket was used to provide a bolt location. This prevents the old style in-the-loop bracket to fit w/o modification.

Sorry for the confusion...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 · (Edited)
These two views of the differential show the later model (post 2006) style front mount cast aluminum bracket and the steel plate tunnel reinforcement bracket. Took me a while to find these. Although GM has discontinued these parts they are readily available from the manufacturer (for GM) through a GM Buick (formerly Buick/Pontiac) dealer. Anyone attempting to convert a Kappa platform originally equipped with the "torque bracket" system will have to go though this exercise. Note the frame welded-on bracket is part of the car. Not clear which cars used the torque bracket but certainly the manual models with turbo did.






 
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