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Correction! I was wrong! the weep hole on the factory pump is on TOP of the pump when installed. The replacement pumps have two weep holes, one in the top and one in the side. the weep hole I pictured is in the side of the pump when installed, The other is a smaller square opening in the TOP of the pump when installed. I just assumed the hole would be on the bottom of the pump (where it should be). that would account for water coming down around the pump. OE pumps have only the top hole and not the side hole.

The same engineer that designed the passenger presence system must have designed the water pump as well.

I like those low ramps in your video. where did you get them?

Bill.
 

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Having the weep hole on top makes it a lot easier to spot a leak during a casual inspection, such as when checking your oil.


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Like raygun says, If you haven't ordered the gear tool yet, get the full circle tool. the half circle tool works but makes it much easier to accidentally drop a bolt into the timing chain gallery.

Bill.
 

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I'm talking about air being trapped in a semi-enclosed cooling system by the act of adding coolant to an overflow tank.
One trick I learned years ago in systems that were hard to purge. Next time you change the thermostat out, drill a 1/16" hole in the new thermostat. It will not effect the operation of the tstat and will allow trapped air to move through the system when the tstat is closed. works well on oil coolant systems that have tstats as well.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Correction! I was wrong! the weep hole on the factory pump is on TOP of the pump when installed. The replacement pumps have two weep holes, one in the top and one in the side. the weep hole I pictured is in the side of the pump when installed, The other is a smaller square opening in the TOP of the pump when installed. I just assumed the hole would be on the bottom of the pump (where it should be). that would account for water coming down around the pump. OE pumps have only the top hole and not the side hole.

The same engineer that designed the passenger presence system must have designed the water pump as well.

I like those low ramps in your video. where did you get them?

Bill.
I have unfortunately, already ordered the half circle version as it was 1 day shipping and cheaper. I guess I will remove all but one bolt and keep something below the sprocket so I don't drop them and then attach the tool for the last bolt. I really hope I don't drop one.

The ramp I found on eBay, I love them, and they fit perfectly for our cars not to hit the bumper. Here is the link https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0117EETEK/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

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I have unfortunately, already ordered the half circle version as it was 1 day shipping and cheaper. I guess I will remove all but one bolt and keep something below the sprocket so I don't drop them and then attach the tool for the last bolt. I really hope I don't drop one.

The ramp I found on eBay, I love them, and they fit perfectly for our cars not to hit the bumper. Here is the link https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0117EETEK/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1
attaching the tool is easier than you think. It comes with three built in bolts that screw into the sprocket and you use the cover plate bolts to attach the tool to the engine. The tool will be fully bolted to the sprocket and to the engine before you remove any of the three water pump bolts.

It's hard to explain, but once you see it, it's really almost foolproof.
 

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Dave @ DDM recommends packing your socket with Vaseline when removing the sprocket bolts. That way they’ll stick to the socket rather than fall into the pit of despair.


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One trick I learned years ago in systems that were hard to purge. Next time you change the thermostat out, drill a 1/16" hole in the new thermostat. It will not effect the operation of the tstat and will allow trapped air to move through the system when the tstat is closed. works well on oil coolant systems that have tstats as well.

Bill
I did this with two holes on my brand new engine that I dropped in this past month. It's worked great.
 

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Discussion Starter #50
So i started the tear down by snapping all 3 heat shield bolts (it was so easy too), how necessary is the turbo heat shield?

What is the thread size so i can drill and tap the hole?
 

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Before you leap to drill and tapping new threads....drill and use an easy out with the remaining threads. With the bolthead broken off there's no tension on the remaining threads.

Drill and easy out.
 

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Before you leap to drill and tapping new threads....drill and use an easy out with the remaining threads. With the bolthead broken off there's no tension on the remaining threads.

Drill and easy out.
Use a LH twist drill bit and you may not even need the EZ-out.
 

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Discussion Starter #55
They are rusted in very tightly, the bolt that was in the turbo, wasn't even tightened down and it broke off.

The top 2 threads in the top part of the heat shield, are they in the exhaust manifold or are they part of the heatshield for the manifold itself? Could I just replace that heatshield to get new & empty threads?
 

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Or just hit them with a blow torch until they glow AND wait for them to cool off enough that you can touch them without burning your digits. After that they should come out very easily.


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One trick I learned years ago in systems that were hard to purge. Next time you change the thermostat out, drill a 1/16" hole in the new thermostat. It will not effect the operation of the tstat and will allow trapped air to move through the system when the tstat is closed. works well on oil coolant systems that have tstats as well.

Bill

LOL I don't know where the confusion is coming from.

GM has been using semi-enclosed cooling systems for over half a century. The overflow tank for example in my 1970 Buick does exactly what it is supposed to do, and this is where you add coolant, not the radiator. Adding coolant to the tank prevents cavitation, and also exciting things like a column of boiling green liquid possibly appearing like magic when you open the radiator cap.

In my old muscle car club, many times I patiently explained to fellow enthusiasts that they would prefer a jiggle valve in the thermostat, yes indeed they should actually run the car with a thermostat, they should use a fan shroud, the overflow tank etc. etc. despite the fairy tales and myths their uncles and older brothers told around the campfire.

I don't misunderstand any of this and I'm not asking for tips and tricks, but I appreciate the extension of advice; I simply haven't indicated I was looking for it. Like I said, what I do not understand is how this air-bubble-in-the-system issue is happening in a 21st century automobile using a very well understood semi-enclosed cooling system. There is either a technique being done wrong or a flaw in the system as designed.
 

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and also exciting things like a column of boiling green liquid possibly appearing like magic when you open the radiator cap.

Incorrect. The system is under pressure - even at the reservoir - and it will happily spray a stream of coolant WAY up in the air.




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Incorrect. The system is under pressure - even at the reservoir - and it will happily spray a stream of coolant WAY up in the air.




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Respectfully, check that sir. The overflow tank is NOT at radiator pressure in my example.

You will please bear in mind that the paragraph which you have quoted from is not in reference to a Solstice. Snipping out a sentence in reference to my old car example sort of skews things.
 
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