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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have raced Track Prepped Porsche's most of my life and strongly agree with the use of synthetic oils. The Wear Protection, adhesion and dissipation properties greatly out perform any Conventional Oil you can buy to date. It you plan on keeping your baby for quite awhile and driving her hard go Synthetic after the first 1000 Miles.

I also recommend you change every fluid in the vehicle to full Synthetic (IE Transmission, Rear End, and Power Steering Oil) right after break-in.

Every vehicle that is built these days for high revving track power is born with Synthetic oils in its working from day 1.

The makers of Porsche and Ferrari have been doing this for years for a reson. It works.....

Hope this was some help. :cool:

Happy Motoring.....

Sol Man
 

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SOL MAN said:
I have raced Track Prepped Porsche's most of my life and strongly agree with the use of synthetic oils. The Wear Protection, adhesion and dissipation properties greatly out perform any Conventional Oil you can buy to date. It you plan on keeping your baby for quite awhile and driving her hard go Synthetic after the first 1000 Miles.

I also recommend you change every fluid in the vehicle to full Synthetic (IE Transmission, Rear End, and Power Steering Oil) right after break-in.

Every vehicle that is built these days for high revving track power is born with Synthetic oils in its working from day 1.

I do not think the makers of Porsche and Ferrari could be wrong.

Hope this was some help. :cool:

Happy Motoring.....

Sol Man
My 2004 Sliverado came with synthetic gear lube in the rear end...
 

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Okay, this does sound like an awesome idea. Now, I think what I'll do is drive an easy 1000 miles and then change the oil. And all the other stuff as well, since you mentioned it.

So what's that gonna cost me?
 

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BadAzSolstice said:
This is going to sound VERY controversial to some people, but it kind of goes along with what SOL MAN has posted.

http://www.mototuneusa.com/break_in_secrets.htm

While he is talking about Motorcycles, the principle is the same, and I will be following his advice.
I think you can come pretty close to following this guys advice AND the owners manual at the same time. Basically what this guy is telling us is that we need to put load on the engine in order to seat the rings. The manual says to vary speeds, which puts load on the engine. The manual says no full throtle starts, which makes sense because you don't want blow by before the rings seat. So accelerate at a good clip, just don't overdo it. And if the wear occurs mostly in the first 20 miles, go ahead and change the oil after a hundred miles or so, then again at 500 or 1500. What's another oil change gonna hurt.
I think all you have to take from this is; Don't rev the engine with no load. Warm up the engine completely before loading for break in. Don't baby it so much that it doesn't get a good seal. Don't run the car at steady speed during break in, especially in the first 20 or 50 miles.
Right?
 
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Brian,

I think you summarized that quite well. I will give it a shot and see what happens.

What would be cool is to have several people do the break in process the way the link talks about, and several people do a normal process, and then dyno all the cars to see how the numbers flesh out.
 

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BadAzSolstice said:
What would be cool is to have several people do the break in process the way the link talks about, and several people do a normal process, and then dyno all the cars to see how the numbers flesh out.
That would be cool. Do you think the guy from Power News has done that with motorcycles for us to review? He did have a pile of 12 cylinders, so he must have had access to a few bikes.
It would be interesting just to see the variations of a bunch of Solstices anyway just to see how tight the tollerances. 'course we'd have to use the same dyno or have them well calibrated.
 

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waiting said:
I think all you have to take from this is; Don't rev the engine with no load. Warm up the engine completely before loading for break in. Don't baby it so much that it doesn't get a good seal. Don't run the car at steady speed during break in, especially in the first 20 or 50 miles.
Right?
And there you have it. :agree:

I break all my vehicles in using this method and I pound on them afterwards for many miles with no issues that other owners sometimes have had. It could be coincidence as we are only talking a handful of new vehicles, but it's what I'll stick with.
 

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chuck mallet was hatting about taking new owners for a test drive- well into triple digits- in mallet modified cars. when i asked him about beaking in his fresh motors, he said he puts them on a dyno and then drives them..fast. the only caution he gave me was not to over rev with no load(i.e. miss a shift) because the piston 'flutter' will deform the rings. sounds much like the advice on the "break in secrets" web page. run it up with gusto and deaccelerate in gear.
 
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