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Discussion Starter #1
So the Solstice is going to be my weekend ride - not my daily driver.

Living in Indiana, this means that I will probably be driving it 1-2x / week from March/April through October. That means I won't be doing much with it during the winter.

1. Is there anything I need to do throughout the week during the summer or is driving it once / week okay?
2. Any recommendations to make sure the engine stays strong during the winter months? I'm sure I don't want it to just sit, do I?

Thanks in advance - might be dumb questions, but I thought I'd ask anyway!

Ryan
 

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New GM cars aren't like they used to be. If you are driving it once a week, that should be fine. If you are going to let it sit for longer than that, you need to go out and start it anyway. If it is going to be Garaged(advised) then you might think about getting some stands for it, to take the weight off of the tires. Call me and I will fill you in on the rest of my thoughts for part time driving use. I also sell the XLR, and no one buys one of those as a daily driver, but that car must be started once every two weeks or the battery dies.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
whatup CC...just sent you a reply email.

this place is slooooooooooooooooooooooooooow today.
 

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Drive more than just a 5 mile trip when you drive it once a week. My mom puts on maybe 2000 miles a year and goes through brakes and exhaust piecse on a more than regular basis due to build up of corrosion. It usually takes 20-30 miles to heat up the exhaust enough to dry out the condensation.
 

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When you park for the winter unhook you negitive battery cable. On my older cars I put fuel stabilizer in the tank and run it to get it into the carb. This keeps your fuel fresh and prevents varnish build up in the carb. I have done this for years and never had a problem. I like to store them with clean oil also. I would check on the fuel stabilizer since it is a new car and see what the service mgr has to say at the dealership to make sure it wont hurt anything but I don't think it will. If your car is stored in a cold place you should fill your fuel tank to prevent condensation and rust in the tank. I over inflate the tires a little to keep them from getting flat spots.

Wax it before you put it away and you can put a pie pan of charcoal in the car to help absorb moisture. If you do put the car on blocks you should remove the wheels so they don't hang on your suspension.

That should pretty well cover the bases.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Wow - thanks for all the advice guys.

:)
 

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Don't inflate past the max PSI shown on tire, flush brake fluid

ateam_77 said:
I over inflate the tires a little to keep them from getting flat spots.

Wax it before you put it away and you can put a pie pan of charcoal in the car to help absorb moisture. If you do put the car on blocks you should remove the wheels so they don't hang on your suspension.

That should pretty well cover the bases.
Note, he did say "a little". ateam_77's suggestion to take the wheels and tires off of the car and store them in a stack is a good one. You can keep them at their normal pressure, and they'll stay nice and round. ;) What ever you do, don't exceed the maximum inflation stamped on the side of the tire. If you do, you'll exceed the rubber's elastic modulus limit, and the tire will start to separate internally.

Others have talked about starting the engine, that's fine, but you really need to run the engine long enough to get it up to full operating temperature, and hold it there for 15 to 20 minutes. If you don't, you'll wind up gumming up the rings, and it may take a while to get them freed up again once you start driving it--if they ever get ungummed, that is...

Brake fluid also absorbs water, lots of water! It's designed to do so. By absorbing water, the brake fluid keeps the parts of the brake system from corroding on the inside. The disadvantage is that when the fluid absorbs water, it's boiling point goes down. Simple fix, flush the brake fluid and put in all new fluid when you bring your beast out of it's winter cave.

Also look into ATE Super Blue brake fluid and their Gold fluid. You can alternate between them each time you go to flush the system, and know for sure you've gotten all of the old fluid out. Start your flushing of the system with the longest run (usually the rear). The ATE Super Blue is a good compromise between a very high performance fluid, and an affordable price (it's about $12 per liter, and you'll need somewhere around or just over a liter for a good flushing)

The Gold fluid is slightly more expensive, ($16/liter) and has slightly higher boiling points, but, really, there is no compromise in using the Super Blue--it's boiling point is VERY high, even wet, and it's enough for racing. I used to boil my fluid, now I don't since I switched from stock DOT 3 to ATE Super Blue, it's great brake fluid.

Also, when you go to flush the fluid, DON'T use the open can you had from last season! That will completely defeat the purpose of having dry (no water) fluid. Even with the cap on, the air in the top of the half empty can will make the fluid just about as wet as the fluid you're trying to replace. Start with a fresh can.

If you don't do your own brake fluid, you can bring your 2 cans of ATE Super Blue to your dealership, and they'll use it instead.

Alternatively, you can just let the dealer flush your system with stock DOT3, and that will be more than adequate. (Just be sure you get a cool down lap when you're running DOT3 out at the track! ;)) Most folks don't flush their brake fluid often enough anyway, and once per year is a good regimen, so by planning to store yours, and flush at the beginning of each season with fresh DOT3 from the dealer, you'll be all set, and MILES ahead of most of the rest of the motoring public. :yesnod:
 
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