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Stock motor regular is ok I have a mildly modified (exhaust/ CAI/ mass air flow sensor/ tune) I run premium
 

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just wondering whats best to use.
The owner's manual on my 2006 NA recommends premium, 91 octane. It does say that it is permissible to use "regular", 87 octane, but cautions that there may be a decrease in performance.

I'd quote from the owners manual, but I'm out of town and the electronic version of the manual is on my server, not accessible to me when I'm on the road.
 

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07 NA Sky now only use regular shell or chevron. I did an extensive test early on and found no major benefit nor increase in mileage burning any higher octane than 87. Never ever heard any knocking even when hitting it with WOT.. Considering the cost of fuel today, if you just drive normally, keep the money in your pocket instead feeding the oil company beast..;)

Here is what my Sky manual states...

Gasoline Octane

Use premium unleaded gasoline with a posted
octane rating of 91 or higher. You may also
use regular unleaded gasoline rated at 87 octane
or higher, but your vehicle’s acceleration may
be slightly reduced, and you may notice a slight
audible knocking noise, commonly referred to
as spark knock. If the octane is less than 87,
you may notice a heavy knocking noise when
you drive. If this occurs, use a gasoline rated
at 87 octane or higher as soon as possible.
Otherwise, you might damage your engine.
If you are using gasoline rated at 87 octane
or higher and you hear heavy knocking, your
engine needs service.
 

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The owner's manual on my 2006 NA recommends premium, 91 octane. It does say that it is permissible to use "regular", 87 octane, but cautions that there may be a decrease in performance.

I'd quote from the owners manual, but I'm out of town and the electronic version of the manual is on my server, not accessible to me when I'm on the road.
Copied from 2006 JustGiveMETheDamnManual.com. Site contains PDFs of 06-09 owners manual. However, I make no claims of current accuracy.

Fuel
Use of the recommended fuel is an important part of the proper maintenance of your vehicle.

Gasoline Octane
Use premium unleaded gasoline with a posted octane rating of 91 or higher. You may also use regular unleaded gasoline rated at 87 octane or higher, but your vehicle’s acceleration may be slightly reduced, and you may notice a slight audible knocking noise, commonly referred to as spark knock. If the octane is less than 87, you may notice a heavy knocking noise when you drive. If this occurs, use a gasoline rated at 87 octane or higher as soon as possible. Otherwise, you might damage your engine. If you are using gasoline rated at 87 octane or higher and you hear heavy knocking, your engine needs service.

Gasoline Specifications
At a minimum, gasoline should meet ASTM specification D 4814 in the United States or CAN/CGSB-3.5 in Canada. Some gasolines may contain an octane-enhancing additive called methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT). General Motors recommends against the use of gasolines containing MMT. See Additives on page 5-6 for additional information.

California Fuel
If your vehicle is certified to meet California Emissions Standards, it is designed to operate on fuels that meet California specifications. See the underhood emission control label. If this fuel is not available in states adopting California emissions standards, your vehicle will operate satisfactorily on fuels meeting federal specifications, but emission control system performance may be affected. The malfunction indicator lamp may turn on and your vehicle may fail a smog-check test. See Malfunction Indicator Lamp on page 3-30. If this occurs, return to your authorized GM dealer for diagnosis. If it is determined that the condition is caused by the type of fuel used, repairs may not be covered by your warranty.

Additives
To provide cleaner air, all gasolines in the United States are now required to contain additives that will help prevent engine and fuel system deposits from forming, allowing your emission control system to work properly. In most cases, you should not have to add anything to your fuel. However, some gasolines contain only the minimum amount of additive required to meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations. To help keep fuel injectors and intake valves clean, or if your vehicle experiences problems due to dirty injectors or valves, look for gasoline that is advertised as TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline. Also, your GM dealer has additives that will help correct and prevent most deposit-related problems. Gasolines containing oxygenates, such as ethers and ethanol, and reformulated gasolines may be available in your area. General Motors recommends that you use these gasolines if they comply with the specifications described earlier. However, E85 (85% ethanol) and other fuels containing more than 10% ethanol must not be used in vehicles that were not designed for those fuels.

Notice: Your vehicle was not designed for fuel that contains methanol. Do not use fuel containing methanol. It can corrode metal parts in your fuel
system and also damage the plastic and rubber parts. That damage would not be covered under your warranty. Some gasolines that are not reformulated for low emissions may contain an octane-enhancing additive called methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT); ask the attendant where you buy gasoline whether the fuel contains MMT. General Motors
recommends against the use of such gasolines. Fuels containing MMT can reduce the life of spark plugs and the performance of the emission control system may be affected. The malfunction indicator lamp may turn on. If this occurs, return to your authorized GM dealer for service.

Fuels in Foreign Countries If you plan on driving in another country outside the
United States or Canada, the proper fuel may be hard to find. Never use leaded gasoline or any other fuel not recommended in the previous text on fuel. Costly repairs caused by use of improper fuel would not be covered by your warranty. To check the fuel availability, ask an auto club, or contact a major oil company that does business in the country where you will be driving.
 

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Do you always use "Top Tier" gas in the Kappa?

Yes in 2.0. (Shell)
No in 2.4. However, after reading plan on trying to alternate between Top Tier and whatevers the cheapest since there are so few Top Tier gasoline stations in my area.

Top Tier
76 Stations/Aloha Petroleum/Chevron/Conoco/CountryMark/Entec Stations/Exxon/Hawaii Fueling/Network (HFN)/Holiday Stationstores, Inc./Kwik Trip / Kwik Star/MFA Oil Co./Mileage Stations/Mobil/Ohana Fuels/Phillips 66/Quik Trip/Rebel Oil/Road Ranger/Severson Oil/Shell/Texaco/Tri-Par Oil Co./U.S. Oil
 

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Hers is a link regarding Top Tier gas and who qualifies, or rather what brand is considered TT.. Top Tier Gasoline Click on "retailers" up above..
 

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I pump the 87 in mine but I usually get Chevron or Shell and stay away from those convienent store brands. if you do not have it tuned, our engines run fine on the lower octane fuels.
 

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I have been using premium (93 octane) here at home, but on my NASSM trip the best I could get was 90 or 91 octane. The car ran OK on the lower octane, and for the first 2500 miles I was getting 30.2 mpg (the last 330 miles I was bucking a stiff headwind, and it pulled my overall average down to 28.5 mpg). I try to use top tier, but had to get some unbranded fuel on the NASSM trip.
 

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if yuh gotta ask

been using super pretty much whole life in everything - nope YOU don't have to - but book says use it , performance and mileage will be better, with no mods YOU NEED ALLLLLLL THE PERFORMANCE YOU CAN GET :rofl::sorry:
 

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Been running 89 or 91 since upgrading to the supercharger. I haven't seen any major difference in running 89 or 91. I see a bit more white stuff come out the back occasionally under hard acceleration when using 91. However, the car also idles better using 91. Running 87 seems to be just fine, but I can feel a slight performance drop.

For the entire life of my car before supercharging I ran 87 and it was just fine and dandy.
 

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From my 2006 Owner's Manual:

Fuel
Use of the recommended fuel is an important part of the proper maintenance of your vehicle.

Gasoline Octane
Use premium unleaded gasoline with a posted octane rating of 91 or higher. You may also use regular unleaded gasoline rated at 87 octane or higher, but your vehicle’s acceleration may be slightly reduced, and you may notice a slight audible knocking noise,
commonly referred to as spark knock. If the octane is less than 87, you may notice a heavy knocking noise when you drive. If this occurs, use a gasoline rated at 87 octane or higher as soon as possible. Otherwise, you might damage your engine. If you are using gasoline rated at 87 octane or higher and you hear heavy knocking, your engine needs service.

Gasoline Specifications
At a minimum, gasoline should meet ASTM specification D 4814 in the United States or CAN/CGSB-3.5 in Canada. Some gasolines may
contain an octane-enhancing additive called methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT). General Motors recommends against the use of gasolines containing MMT. See Additives on page 5-6 for additional information.

California Fuel
If your vehicle is certified to meet California Emissions Standards, it is designed to operate on fuels that meet California specifications. See the underhood emission control label. If this fuel is not available in states adopting California emissions standards, your vehicle will operate satisfactorily on fuels meeting federal specifications, but emission control system performance may be affected. The malfunction indicator lamp may turn on and your vehicle may fail a smog-check test. See Malfunction Indicator Lamp on page 3-30. If this occurs, return to your authorized GM dealer for diagnosis. If it is determined that the condition is caused by the type of fuel used, repairs may not be covered by your warranty.

Additives
To provide cleaner air, all gasolines in the United States are now required to contain additives that will help prevent engine and fuel system deposits from forming, allowing your emission control system to work properly. In most cases, you should not have to add anything to your fuel. However, some gasolines contain only the minimum amount of additive required to meet U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulations. To help keep fuel injectors and intake valves clean, or if your vehicle experiences problems due to dirty injectors or valves, look for gasoline that is advertised as TOP TIER Detergent Gasoline. Also, your
GM dealer has additives that will help correct and prevent most deposit-related problems. Gasolines containing oxygenates, such as ethers and ethanol, and reformulated gasolines may be available in your area. General Motors recommends that you use
these gasolines if they comply with the specifications described earlier. However, E85 (85% ethanol and other fuels containing more than 10% ethanol must not be used in vehicles that were not designed for those fuels.

Notice: Your vehicle was not designed for fuel that contains methanol. Do not use fuel containing methanol. It can corrode metal parts in your fuel system and also damage the plastic and rubber parts. That damage would not be covered under your warranty.
Some gasolines that are not reformulated for low emissions may contain an octane-enhancing additive called methylcyclopentadienyl manganese tricarbonyl (MMT); ask the attendant where you buy gasoline whether the fuel contains MMT. General Motors recommends against the use of such gasolines. Fuels containing MMT can reduce the life of spark plugs and the performance of the emission control system may be affected. The malfunction indicator lamp may turn on. If this occurs, return to your authorized GM dealer
for service.
 

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Gasoline with a higher octane rating does not self detonate easily, and burns more evenly and cleaner then the cheaper lower-octane fuel , thus is more resistant to self detonation and knocking. In Europe there are only 2 grades .. 87 does not exist. Due to the higher compression of theses engines..Self detonation can happen easier.. therefore higher grades are recomended.. The extra $ 4 to $ 5 per fill up is worth it V.S. Cost $$ of How many fouled or burnt sensors ??
 

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Whatever I can afford at that particular fillup. the werks tune was set to 93, I try some 100 every now and then, sometimes mid and often 87. Works on all grades, does better the higher the octane. by better, I mean mopower.
 
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