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I think I remember reading a post that the tires will be Goodyear RS-A type? Do we know for sure? It's strange because the Solstice in the DVD is wearing Goodyear Eagle F1s, the one in the playbook has Bridgestone tires, and then I have seen the RS-A on the pics on the web.

I really hope they are the F1s or the Bridgestones, but I doubt it :(
 

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Nope - as far as we all can tell, officially they are Eagle RS-A's.

Scan and post the pics of the tread and I can prolly trace down the playbook tire...
 

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personally Im going to switch my tires out for low-profile aftermarkets, I like Neo-gen, they have a good balance between looks and performance. All this of course after the starting tires wear out or the warranty on them, if any, is up
 

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when my the eagle's bite it i think im going to opt for 16 inch lighter wheels and higher profile tires... better performance- i just hope it doesnt kill the looks of the car.
 

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DLD84 said:
personally Im going to switch my tires out for low-profile aftermarkets, I like Neo-gen, they have a good balance between looks and performance. All this of course after the starting tires wear out or the warranty on them, if any, is up
Why would you do that? What does the aftermarket tire manufacturer, who's building a generic tire for any old car, have over the people who are desiging the tire specifically for the Solstice?
 

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ddecart said:
Why would you do that? What does the aftermarket tire manufacturer, who's building a generic tire for any old car, have over the people who are desiging the tire specifically for the Solstice?
Do you mean the tires or the rims ddecart? Because the tires are generic RS-A's made by Goodyear. If you mean rims then I understand. However pretty much most rims follow a set of standards that if met by other makers you shouldn't totally destroy the cars handling. Going from 18" to 17" or even 16" is mainly for two reasons. Economicaly the rims and the tires are far cheaper. Also going to a smaller rim allows for lighter rims with a smaller outer mass. This permits for faster acceleration due to a lower rotational inertia.
 

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godspeed06 said:
when my the eagle's bite it i think im going to opt for 16 inch lighter wheels and higher profile tires... better performance- i just hope it doesnt kill the looks of the car.
You'll have enough sidewall doing that to go whitewalls. Plus you will get extra side movement of tires which will affect the handling.
 

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achieftain said:
You'll have enough sidewall doing that to go whitewalls. Plus you will get extra side movement of tires which will affect the handling.
Roger that, 18's in general terms help handling.

I hate goodyear RS-A's with a passion but I guess Ill run them for a year or 2. Or say I will and replace them within 6 months like I typically do.

Note: Ill doubt youll see a real performance tire on the car base for cost reasons. Although RS-A's suck and arent cheap
 

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brentil said:
Because the tires are generic RS-A's made by Goodyear. .

This isn't necessarily true. Even though the name on the tire is the same, many OEM tires, especially performance tires, are tuned for the specific vehicle.

There is a lot of magic that the manufacturer can do with compound, construction, and tread pattern. Two tires with the same name can perform wildly differently from one part number to another.
 

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Brentil,

Just be careful downsizing. Especially for the front wheels - many times once a minimum wheel size is determined, parts have a tendency to fill the available packaging space. That includes things like control arms, tie rods... even brake calipers.

The front rotors are 296mm diameter. I bet 16"s are tight.

17" may be ok, but you may run the risk of contacting components when you jack up your car, or if you make a tight turn. Or you may have to move to a 7" or 7 1/2" rim to avoid parts hitting.

The suspension is known as a "low-arm, short-long-arm" suspension. This means both the upper and lower ball joints are INSIDE the wheel - and usually there is very tight clearance of the wheel on maximum turns to the control arms and the steering tie rod.

If you have to go to a thinner wheel, you may give up handling.


Billabongi,

it's not so much the 18" that helps handling as much as the size of the tire. 245 width is a great bonus. 8" rims is a plus for handling. 45 aspect ration is another benefit, tho I would think that - assuming there wasn't too much problem with rim damage, a 40 aspect ratio would have been better.

the 18 part of it only helps because it slightly increases the air capacity of the tire.

The sidewall height (width X aspect ratio/100) PLUS the air volume of the entire tire as calculated by the size determines the load capacity.

To a point, the higher the load capacity vs. the load you are operating at, the better your handling is going to be. The shorter your sidewall height, the better your handling. The wider the wheel, and the wider the tread (to a point) the better your handling.

The actual wheel size is a secondary factor, and will start to become a major issue the larger it gets due to mass and inertia.

I'm beginning to think that P245/40R18 tires would be a great start. Should be better handling, but you won't find any mud and snow (at least I think you won't) in that size. And only if it doesn't result in a bunch of damage to wheels (potholes in SE MI are more like "kettleholes").
 

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i just wonder how much the gear ratios have been changed to offset such a larger tire for such a weak engine. for a long time 18 wheels were saved for very high preformance cars. plus the extra weight sucks, im still not sure what will be the best thing to do...
 

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solsticeman said:
Billabongi,

it's not so much the 18" that helps handling as much as the size of the tire. 245 width is a great bonus. 8" rims is a plus for handling. 45 aspect ration is another benefit, tho I would think that - assuming there wasn't too much problem with rim damage, a 40 aspect ratio would have been better.

the 18 part of it only helps because it slightly increases the air capacity of the tire.

The sidewall height (width X aspect ratio/100) PLUS the air volume of the entire tire as calculated by the size determines the load capacity.

To a point, the higher the load capacity vs. the load you are operating at, the better your handling is going to be. The shorter your sidewall height, the better your handling. The wider the wheel, and the wider the tread (to a point) the better your handling.

The actual wheel size is a secondary factor, and will start to become a major issue the larger it gets due to mass and inertia.

I'm beginning to think that P245/40R18 tires would be a great start. Should be better handling, but you won't find any mud and snow (at least I think you won't) in that size. And only if it doesn't result in a bunch of damage to wheels (potholes in SE MI are more like "kettleholes").

I know thats why I said in general. I didnt feel like going into detail at the time :) Ive done this with my past 2 cars so I know the benefits and such. Id prefer the 45 just for tire width factor. 40 is getting mighty small and not much rim protection
 

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brentil said:
Do you mean the tires or the rims ddecart? Because the tires are generic RS-A's made by Goodyear. If you mean rims then I understand. However pretty much most rims follow a set of standards that if met by other makers you shouldn't totally destroy the cars handling. Going from 18" to 17" or even 16" is mainly for two reasons. Economicaly the rims and the tires are far cheaper. Also going to a smaller rim allows for lighter rims with a smaller outer mass. This permits for faster acceleration due to a lower rotational inertia.
ddecart said:
Why would you do that? What does the aftermarket tire manufacturer, who's building a generic tire for any old car, have over the people who are desiging the tire specifically for the Solstice?
Yes I was speaking of the tires, the rims I dont think Id ever mess with, they were pretty much designed to fit the car, so changing them would be a very tough call, not to mention an expensive one.(But the fact that they come stock with 18s is SWEET in my opinion) I go for after market tires because I think the tires can have an effect on the appeal of the car, i like tires that can offer good performance but also good looks(mostly tread) but I do think it makes a different, thats said Goodyear has some pretty good tires. No snow to worry about here in sunny Florida so I basically just need a good wet/dry tire with a nice quiet ride.
 

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solsticeman said:
but you won't find any mud and snow (at least I think you won't) in that size. And only if it doesn't result in a bunch of damage to wheels (potholes in SE MI are more like "kettleholes").
Snow tires in most instances are taller than summer tires in the same size and often the approprite snow is a smaller size than the summer. Best way to go is the reccomendation from TireRack or Tiretown, etc.

Oh, and go all four corners.
 

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brentil said:
Do you mean the tires or the rims ddecart? Because the tires are generic RS-A's made by Goodyear.
I'm talking tires. And like Nytlyt said, tires that come on your new car as OEM are not generic at all. If they are, it's a rare situation. Tires are specifically designed to the particular vehicle application. You can take 2 RS-A's in the same size but from different OEM applications and they're probably going to be different in some way in their construction. Whether it's a compound change, a ply angle change here or there, something different in the sidewall construction, whatever. There is really no way to tell from the outside.

As for aftermarket tires, if they don't have a specific OEM application, they don't have performance specifications to meet. Is that aftermarket tire stiffer or softer than the OEM tire? You can't tell. Is that aftermarket tire even the same as the last 'identical' one you bought 4 years ago? Possibly not. Tire companies are making tweaks to their tires through the years. Save 4 cents per tire by altering this compound a little? Sure, why not. They don't have to meet an OEM's performance criteria.

Heck, you really can't even tell if that aftermarket "Max Performance Summer Only" tire is actually a better performing tire than the OEM all season tire. It might not be. Until tire companies start advertising standardized force & moment data for their aftermarket tires, you'll never know. You can only buy them and get a seat of the pants feel for them. Maybe time the car on a track or something like that.
 

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ddecart said:
I'm talking tires. And like Nytlyt said, tires that come on your new car as OEM are not generic at all. If they are, it's a rare situation. Tires are specifically designed to the particular vehicle application. You can take 2 RS-A's in the same size but from different OEM applications and they're probably going to be different in some way in their construction. Whether it's a compound change, a ply angle change here or there, something different in the sidewall construction, whatever. There is really no way to tell from the outside.

As for aftermarket tires, if they don't have a specific OEM application, they don't have performance specifications to meet. Is that aftermarket tire stiffer or softer than the OEM tire? You can't tell. Is that aftermarket tire even the same as the last 'identical' one you bought 4 years ago? Possibly not. Tire companies are making tweaks to their tires through the years. Save 4 cents per tire by altering this compound a little? Sure, why not. They don't have to meet an OEM's performance criteria.

Heck, you really can't even tell if that aftermarket "Max Performance Summer Only" tire is actually a better performing tire than the OEM all season tire. It might not be. Until tire companies start advertising standardized force & moment data for their aftermarket tires, you'll never know. You can only buy them and get a seat of the pants feel for them. Maybe time the car on a track or something like that.
I don't know nearly as much about tires as most of you, b/c we don't really get into that kind of stuff. BUT, GM is the only major mfg. that has its own
"Tire Performance Criteria." Every OEM tire that GM uses for production has a little letter in a circle on the sidewall that shows its GM rating. The tire maker doesn't rate it, like a "Z" for high speed, etc., it's done by GM on the test tracks, and on the specific vehicle that it's applied to for intended use (ie commuting, all terrain tires.) Stop into a lot and see how many different types of tires there are on the trucks. I think we have like 6 just on the 1500's.

It also comes into play with the stabilitrack, ATC, std. trac control, about anything that has to do with vehicle stability and tire monitor systems. If you start changing tires and rims w/o talking to a service manager or reputable tire dealer, esp. with the DIC option depinding upon what it actually monitors, your dash may light up like a X-mas tree. Ask one of the guys with a 98-newer 'Vette that had problems. I would guess you could reprogram the computer module, but this is a whole other subject for someone who has actually done it.
 

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conejo148 said:
I don't know nearly as much about tires as most of you, b/c we don't really get into that kind of stuff. BUT, GM is the only major mfg. that has its own
"Tire Performance Criteria." Every OEM tire that GM uses for production has a little letter in a circle on the sidewall that shows its GM rating. The tire maker doesn't rate it, like a "Z" for high speed, etc., it's done by GM on the test tracks, and on the specific vehicle that it's applied to for intended use (ie commuting, all terrain tires.) Stop into a lot and see how many different types of tires there are on the trucks. I think we have like 6 just on the 1500's.
GM is the only company to have it's own performance criteria. GM OE tires are arguably the most stringently tested tires in the industry. The tire speed ratings, load ratings, max pressure, treadwear index, and those sorts of things don't come from GM. Those come from the tire manufacturers (and there are many industry standards that govern those sorts of things). GM might specify that a given tire for a given program needs to be Z-rated, in which case the tire manufacturer builds a Z rated tire.

You have a good point with the stabilitrac comment. All of the programming and development of those systems are done with the OE tire on the car and they're optimized for that tire. Will a different tire perform the same? adequately? horribly? it all depends on things you have no choice in when buying a new tire.
 

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ddecart said:
it all depends on things you have no choice in when buying a new tire.
But you do have a choice because there are semi-independant tests conducted by the mags from time to time comparing performance of various tires. Another thing to look at when you are ready to change is to see what Bob Bondurant or SKip Barber use in their schools. Bet they go through a lot of tires.
 
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