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I need some help. Recently I damaged a wheel stud on the rear passenger side axle. Does anyone know if the stud replacement process is something that I might be able to do at home using common tools, or is the process more involved, having to use specialty tools and alike. I guess what I am really getting at is, can I replace the stud without having to remove the axle from the car, or can I remove the wheel, the brake rotor and then press the stud out and replace with new?
 

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I recently did two. You'll need a 35mm Axle nut socket, 18mm, 15mm sockets, and some extensions, and a torx bit (forget the size) for the rotor set screw.
Remove the wheel.
Remove the axle nut. Manual says to replace this after every removal.
Remove 3 hub assembly bolts. The front hub assembly & brake dust shield should be free to move now. You may need to switch between Neutral & gears in the process.
The damaged studs should be able to pop out with a hammer. Once out, grease the splines on the new one, slide it through into engagement. At this point, I used washers and a lugnut to press/pull the new stud into proper placement. Then do the reverse re-assembly, noting how the shield sat, etc.
 

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That is the way that I do it and also torque to 100 foot pounds to make sure that stud is seated. Then reinstall wheel and torque to 100 foot pounds....Skip....:):cool::)
 

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Great and timely thread. I have had one stud busted on each front tire for over a year.. but the dealers keep telling me they can't order any so I'm still waiting. Finally got one stud and nut in... I'm waiting to pick up a few extras just in case I have issues.. but I still think the 100 ft-lbs. of torque on the lugnuts is too high, but I know that's what the manual says to use.

My issue is when I swap tires out for autocrossing every weekend I (sometimes) get one lugnut to bind and the only thing to do at that point is grab my breaker bar and apply a heck of a lot of force the shear the stud and run with one missing lug nut.
 

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Service Manual Procedure

From the 2007 Solstice Service Manual:


Wheel Stud Replacement
Tools Required-J 43631 Ball Joint Remover

Removal Procedure

1) Raise and support the vehicle.

2) Remove the tire and wheel assembly.

3) Remove the brake rotor.



4) Using the J 43631 , remove and discard the wheel stud.


Installation Procedure



1) Install the NEW wheel stud into the wheel bearing hub.

2) Add enough washers (3) in order to draw the stud into the hub.

3) Install the wheel nut (1) with the flat side against the washers.

4) Tighten the wheel nut (1) until the head of the wheel stud is fully seated against the back of the bearing hub flange.

5) Remove the wheel nut (1) and the washers (3).

6) Install the brake rotor.

7) Install the tire and wheel assembly.

8) Lower the vehicle.
 

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One step missing from above

The instructions from the service manual are very helpfully, but missing one step. I found that to get the new stud in I had to remove the three bolts that hold the dust shield on. Then the whole hub will move a couple of inches or so, enough so you can get the new stud in the hole.
 

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According to my dealer and my tire center, the issue isn't torque, it's the lousy thread cut on the studs from GM. Slivers break off and jam the nut. I eventually got 5 spares in the trunk/ Took over a week for GM to get them to the dealer.
 

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Hello,

Anti-seize, copper based, at any good parts store. One of the first things I did when new, remove the wheel, anti-seize stud, replace wheel, times four. Everything I own with four wheels has the studs anti-seized, the ATV's, Dump, Enclosed, and RV trailers, and 1 car, 1 mini van, 1 pick-up, 1 Suburban, and oh yea, the SKY.... No wheels have come off yet. Pick-up can vote in two years, Suburban in one..

Mike
 

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Hello all!
Just had the binding nut on the back wheel, please please could someone send me the correct part number for the rear wheel stud. I live in Italy and thus the parts are a bit difficult to find!
Any help greatly recieved.
Jay
 

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09596978 according to my bag of 5.
 

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Rear wheel stud?

The instructions from the service manual are very helpfully, but missing one step. I found that to get the new stud in I had to remove the three bolts that hold the dust shield on. Then the whole hub will move a couple of inches or so, enough so you can get the new stud in the hole.
Naples did you work on the front stud(s) or rear stud(s)? I have a broken rear wheel stud. I removed the three 15 mm bolts to the dust shield and nothing moved. I wonder like Rob said that you have tap them in using a mallet I guess that would be space where the brake caliper was and flat part of the hub? The new wheel stud gets started in the wheel hub but is cocked even with the flat side against the body of the wheel hub. At this point is it mallet time?
 

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So the dreaded broken wheel studs hit my track Solstice today - two of them on the same front wheel! I've got until Friday night to fix the studs.

This thread and its 2019 cousin suggest that a GM dealer will be the only place where I could possibly find the special knurled studs on short notice. Here's another question, however: in the Solstice Performance book, they take some ARP long studs and grind down an edge so that they fit in the Solstice hub.

My question is, has anyone actually tried free-hand grinding the studs to the right shape? I'm not a machinist so I'd be putting them in a vise and hitting them with a handheld grinder.

Thanks!

Dave
 

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Just as an update, I did some more research and I've ordered the OEM studs from a dealer around me, the ARP studs from the Solstice Performance book (will likely return) and the ARP Miata studs with the flat part. I'll leave a description of what the repair was like when it's all done!
 

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So the dreaded broken wheel studs hit my track Solstice today - two of them on the same front wheel! I've got until Friday night to fix the studs.

This thread and its 2019 cousin suggest that a GM dealer will be the only place where I could possibly find the special knurled studs on short notice. Here's another question, however: in the Solstice Performance book, they take some ARP long studs and grind down an edge so that they fit in the Solstice hub.

My question is, has anyone actually tried free-hand grinding the studs to the right shape? I'm not a machinist so I'd be putting them in a vise and hitting them with a handheld grinder.

Thanks!

Dave
All you're doing is take the round head and making into a "D" shape by knocking off an edge a bit so that it clears the hub as it's inserted from the backside. Not a big issue... could be done with a handheld grinder, dremel, bench top grinder, or even a nice file without issue.
 

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All you're doing is take the round head and making into a "D" shape by knocking off an edge a bit so that it clears the hub as it's inserted from the backside. Not a big issue... could be done with a handheld grinder, dremel, bench top grinder, or even a nice file without issue.
As long as you don't overheat and weaken it.
 

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Just as an update, I did some more research and I've ordered the OEM studs from a dealer around me, the ARP studs from the Solstice Performance book (will likely return) and the ARP Miata studs with the flat part. I'll leave a description of what the repair was like when it's all done!
OK, two wheel studs are replaced!

I have a few observations which could be helpful for others:

-I got the OEM studs (9596978) from the local Buick dealer on 24 hours notice. Not bad, besides the price! They are just like the original ones, e.g. terrible quality.

-I didn't even try the ARP studs in the Solstice Performance Book (ARP 100-7702) because they were very similar to the Miata studs but would have required grinding.

-The Miata studs (ARP 100-7720) seem like the perfect solution! Unlike the OEM studs, they are extremely high quality. Unfortunately, they are too long to get in the hole (that's what she said) without taking the hub off of the axle. Which brings us to...

-It was quite difficult to get the old studs out and the new ones in with the dust shield in place. I removed the three 15mm hub bolts, but the shield/hub wouldn't budge, probably due to age and road salt, so I ended up taking my BFH to the shield to create some room, which worked well enough to get the OEM studs in. Next time, I guess I will get a giant 35mm axle nut head and an axle nut and just take the hubs off, then bash on the studs with the hub in a vise.

-I used a tie rod puller to get the studs out but frankly the old, rusted-on studs wouldn't budge at first without some encouragement from the BFH. I tried to be soft with in given the advice to avoid damaging the bearings.

All-in-all, besides having to return a S-ton of parts, it was pretty straightforward. 4/10 difficulty!

Dave
 

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You'd have to put some serious heat into a stud to weaken it with a grinder.

I'm not actually sure you could do it with how little material you're removing. At the rate you'd have to remove material, you'd be done well before you ever got up to those temperatures.
 
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