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Anybody have a clue as to why GM put half the fuses under the hood and the other half under the carpet? Is there any rhyme or reason to splitting them up? Clearly the ones under the carpet are harder to get to.
 

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Anybody have a clue as to why GM put half the fuses under the hood and the other half under the carpet? Is there any rhyme or reason to splitting them up? Clearly the ones under the carpet are harder to get to.
The ones in the footwell are also a part of the BCM - Body Control Module, while the ones under the hood are not.

The other reason might be that this is a car where they used GM parts bin parts whereever they could to save costs.

:dunno:
 

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Just think yourself lucky it's no my daughter's Accord, she has fuses in the engine bay and in BOTH side door jambs (at least)!

There's a certain amount of reasoning going on there... the fuses in the engine bay are primarily high-current ones for the engine and front half of the car. The ones inside are for the interior and rear half (again, primarily).

More importantly, the BCM is in the footwell, and the fuses there protect all the circuits that the BCM supports.

DaveOC: SNAP!
 

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No expert, but mold quite a few connectors and fuse housings. The standard parts bin mentality is indeed part of it, but then again, more and more fuse/relay housings are being made of a standard design that can be "mixed and matched" for the particular verhicles requirements.

These "modularized" designs can actually reduce part count and speed installation. One section can be designed to handle the engine and charging systems needs and that would be used across all platforms with that engine. Then you have another to handle the various internal options on a particular model.

I believe the amount of current draw, as Soup mentioned, has to be considered also. With all the additions to vehicle systems, the amperage being drawn was getting huge and the wiring harnesses getting so thick they were difficult to route and install. There was a background effort to get vehicles up to 42 volts to combat this, but I think it's pretty much dead now. Those high amperage draws result in high temps, so dividing them up into separate modules can also help manage the heat.
 

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Tomato Soup gave a good answer. Put the fuses closest to the parts they serve. Very llittle room for massive fuse panels. I 've seen three and four panels as the manufacturers have added more electrical items to the cars. The more electrical we have, the more need for fuses. Just remember we are on the verge of eliminating 12V batteries due to the need for more voltage.
 

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Much better answers that what I thought it might have been. My first thought was that they were going to put them all in the trunk, but discovered that there was not enough room for them.
 

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I think it's a common practice. In my Grand Am there is one in the engine compartment and one on either side of the dash (Where it meets up with the door).

Of course this causes confusion. When I bought my Grand Am (as a program car), the lighter didn't work. I didn't really care much as back in 2000 Cell phones weren't that popular and the ones you had lasted long enough to not need to charge them in your car. Back then I tried to check the fuses, but couldn't figure it out (only checked the ones on the inside as I thought that was all of them). It wasn't until about 2010 when I started commuting 2 hours to work that I needed it and only then realized that the fuse that i could never find was in the engine compartment (seems like an odd place to me for that particular fuse since the cigarette lighter is interior).
 
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