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I was just curious how many people are from Ohio and how many are future EOP owners. I happen to work at GM here in Mansfield, which is about 15 minutes away from Mid-Ohio. I might ask around about getting some time on the track there for us Sol owners.....
 

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Thexrickx said:
I was just curious how many people are from Ohio and how many are future EOP owners. I happen to work at GM here in Mansfield, which is about 15 minutes away from Mid-Ohio. I might ask around about getting some time on the track there for us Sol owners.....
And you would be my hero if you pulled this off.
 

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Let's see what google says the shortest route to mid ohio is......
 

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Thexrickx said:
I was just curious how many people are from Ohio and how many are future EOP owners. I happen to work at GM here in Mansfield, which is about 15 minutes away from Mid-Ohio. I might ask around about getting some time on the track there for us Sol owners.....
because almost nobody on the east or west coast would buy a pontiac? :devil:


So all the GM/Chrysler/Ford drivers end up in the middle?
 

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sight unseen said:
because almost nobody on the east or west coast would buy a pontiac? :devil:


So all the GM/Chrysler/Ford drivers end up in the middle?
I must have some of that Ohio blood,I live on the east coast,
I hope i don't catch something.
 

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Andrew Jackson said:
I must have some of that Ohio blood,I live on the east coast,
I hope i don't catch something.
I think cars like the sol make it contagious....

I was rasied a ma(&(hole (actually right near you in Wilmington), but from my recolection, during the mid 80s everyone abandoned thier chevettes and buics and started jumping into camrys and accords....most haven't looked back sense...same trend in NYC, and conneticut

I have been on the west coast for over a year, and have seen much of the same thing
 

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We Ohioans just have good taste. I was actually surprised to see that there is someone on this forum that lives in Cortland OH. Not far at all from where I live in Champion.
 

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Well, I've lived in Ohio for about 10 years now, but I'm originally from Michigan. Go Blue!!!!! But my wife was born, raised, and still lives here. She has made it her life's work to prove to me that EVERYTHING has it's origin here in Ohio. Well, she hasn't converted me 100% yet, but she gets closer every day. You name it, it's from Ohio. Even on TV shows, whether it's the main character or the suspect or the good guy, someone has either recently been to, grew up in, lived in, went to school in, you named it, Ohio. As much as it kills me to say it, Ohio truely is the "Heart Of It All." But I'll say it again, GO BLUE!!!!!!
 

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I live in Columbus and would LOVE to drive my new Solstice (delivery TBD but have a Start of Production date) on the Mid Ohio track. Last year I completed the Acura High Performance Course at Mid Ohio. On another thread someone suggested that EOP owners meet at the SCCA meet in September. Hope that your are successful in getting some track time!
 

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Ay 2 cents

I am from Illinois myself.

I've driven through Ohio a couple of times.

As strange as it may seem, it actually ocurred to me that Ohio has some pretty good roadster driving conditions.

Especially in the Eastern and Southern parts of the state, you have a lot of sparesly used rural roads that go through a lot of nice hill territory. Plenty of sharp curves, up and down, and decent enough scenery to boot.
 

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Lawnchair said:
We Ohioans just have good taste. I was actually surprised to see that there is someone on this forum that lives in Cortland OH. Not far at all from where I live in Champion.
Lawnchair,

I notice that you've listed two Ohio locations, Warren & Dayton. Back in the early 80's when I was attending the Univ. of Dayton, I was in a co-op program for three years at the Packard Electric Division in Warren and they put me up in housing in Cortland. Small world. We lived in the Dayton area for 15 years before relocating to the Cleveland area in 1997. What's your connection to Dayton?

To answer the question about why so many Solstice owners in Ohio, I would say because after going through the winters we've had lately (I especially hate the gray skies, cold doesn't bother me) we want to spend as much time in the sun and open air as possible. At least that's my reason. Also there are many, many plants and GM divisions located here. When I lived in the Dayton
area there were 5 GM divisions there alone.
 

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I live in Canton Ohio Marla
 

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Ohio: 200 Years

While it is fun to kid about the midwest and States like Ohio, I'll bet most Americans dont know US history or remember it well enough to realize that among other things, Ohio was the birth place of Presidents, Aviation, the first American in space and most of the Industratial Revolution that makes the great USA the modern world leader it is today. While we have corn fields and beautiful back roads here, we also have some of the strongest ties to the automotive industry and you cant swing a dead cat by the tail without hitting someone who loves the internal combustion engine hooked to some wheels in some form or another. Same goes for our fine neighbors in states a good ways out in all directions.

A great historical synopsis was produced in the film Ohio: 200 Years which was made for the Ohio Bicentennial.

http://www.wviz.org/ohio200/

John Fleischman:

Ohio sent 340,000 men to the Civil War, and ten percent of them died. There were only 2.1 million people in Ohio at the time so proportionately we sent far more manpower than any state in the Union. We won the Civil War. Ohio won the Civil War and dominated national politics through the turn of the century.

Narration:

Between 1840 and 1920, Ohio sent eight men to the White House. Five of them fought in the Civil War.

George Knepper:

Ohio, after the Civil War, was one of the most rapidly industrializing and urbanizing regions of the country. Old industries just exploded with new growth. Then a whole host of new industries arose.

Narration:

The booming new industries included Goodrich, Goodyear, Firestone, Sieberling, Libbey Glass, Quaker Oats, Republic Steel in Youngstown, Autolite in Toledo.

Timothy Messer-Kruse:

Autolite was the Microsoft of the 1920s, the dynamic cutting-edge venture capital company that was showing tremendous success.

August Pust:

If you want to really study ethnicity there’s no better place but here in Ohio. This is where the base was, the survival ship of ethnicity. Like in Europe there were wars, all kinds of wars, ethnic cleansing. Here we survived and we survived together.



Kathy Wade:

We are a multitude of cultures and people. And when you look at me and you hear do this song, if it raises any sense of pride within you my job is done, I think. Because you see someone who looks like me singing our song, the country’s song.

Oh, say can you see by the dawn’s early light.


Narration:

For two centuries, the successive waves of immigration had peopled Ohio, just as they had America. But Ohio has done more than simply follow the grand movements and large-scale design of American history. From the late 19th century on, the state began to help create that history -- and the America we have today.

Archive announcer:

Ohio has many famous sons, among them Thomas A. Edison. Today, Edison's genius is appropriately reflected by the world's largest light bulb, here shown in Cleveland's General Electric Lighting Institute

Narration:

The bulletproof vest and the gas mask were developed in Ohio. Of course this was after Dr. Richard Gatling of Cincinnati, had invented the first machine gun.

Ohioans invented the bar code, the switchboard, the pop top, ready mix cement. Fiberglass comes from Toledo, rolled sheet metal from Middletown. But the geographical heart of Ohio’s inventive spirit was Dayton.

Mark Bernstein:

In 1880 the U.S. Patent office determined that Dayton relative to population produced the third most patents of any city in the country. And by 1900 it ranked first. And it ranked first before the automotive inventor Charles Kettering came along.



Narration:

Charles Kettering was a genius, pure and simple. In 1908, he was moonlighting in a barn behind his house, working on a knotty problem called the “automobile.”



Mark Bernstein:

In 1908 an automobile didn't work very well. To start it you had to crank it by hand. The ignition system ran off a battery, which would be depleted quite rapidly. And he headlights were acetylene lamps used by miners at the time. Kettering took those three problems and came up with one solution which was the integrated starting lighting ignition system, which your car has today



Narration:

Kettering's unified system started the car, lit the lights and ignited the gas, all at once. And it did something that was even more revolutionary.



Mark Bernstein:

How should we phrase this one? Middle class women in 1908 were not supposed to be mechanically versed. If a car was going to be hand cranked that it was not going to be driven by a woman. The self starter would allow a car to be driven by anyone.



Narration:

Kettering had invented the soccer mom. But he wasn’t quite done. He developed the first guided missile, then went on to oversee the invention of modern refrigeration, balloon tires, the high compression engine, and high-octane gas. In one quiet lifetime this Ohioan had done as much as anyone to drive America into the age we live in now -- the age of the automobile.



Narration:

Like Kettering, John H. Patterson was from Dayton. Like Kettering, he would have a great -- and greatly unacknowledged -- effect on our world. He's often remembered, now, merely because he was odd. Very odd.



Mark Bernstein:

He was nuts. Patterson took four baths a day. And they were timed baths. He would take a ten-minute bath, a twelve-minute bath, an eight-minute bath. He wore underwear made from pool table felt and he slept with his head hanging off the side of the bed because if you slept like a normal person you would use up all the oxygen near you and you would die in the middle of the night, without even getting revenge on all the people you planned to get revenge on the following day.



Narration:

Patterson was far from the corporate type -- yet he would change the way corporations everywhere would do business.



Mark Bernstein:

In 1884, Patterson was nearly bankrupt and nearing 40, he spent $6500 to acquire the rights to a device known as a cash register, which would have been valuable had anyone at the time wanted one, which no one did.



Narration:

The year he bought the company, National Cash Register sold about 300 machines. Its bank balance? 91 cents.



Mark Bernstein:

Patterson was persuaded that the cash register was the greatest machine ever invented, and that people would buy it if only they knew about it. So he invented direct mail advertising. He wrote out twelve separate advertisements on the marvels of the cash register. Got together a list of five thousand prospects and mailed everybody on the list one of the sheets every day for two weeks, not counting Sundays.



He opened the first sales training force for salesmen. Established the first sales territories, sales quotas. Salesmen were supposed to dress with sort of fashionable dignity. No cigars. No backslapping. No feet on the counter. They were to be all business.



Narration:

His sales techniques worked. Over the next two decades, NCR would sell an average of 50,000 machines a year.



Mark Bernstein:

Patterson created what he called the model factory of the world. His employees had extensive fringe benefits. Profit sharing, paid suggestion system, free education, free medical care and dental care. Every six months everyone who worked at NCR was weighed, and if they were underweight, a glass of malted milk was brought to their workplace every morning until their weight came up to the number he thought it should be.



Narration:

But Patterson still had certain tics. One of them was the overwhelming impulse to fire people.

At one time, Charles Kettering had worked for Patterson. Patterson fired him six times. One executive learned he was fired when he saw his desk being burnt on the lawn.
http://www.wviz.org/ohio200/releases/script.html


It is a most impressive work. The spirit of America as embodied in the automotive enthusiast is pervasive throughout the State.

Why is Ohio so popular? Just luck I guess, or maybe it's being in the right place at the right time. ;)

Oh, and it would be great to drive around Mid-Ohio. Maybe GM is listening and will sponsor something there?


Sorry about the long post.
 

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Bonzo said:
Well, I've lived in Ohio for about 10 years now, but I'm originally from Michigan. Go Blue!!!!! But my wife was born, raised, and still lives here. She has made it her life's work to prove to me that EVERYTHING has it's origin here in Ohio. Well, she hasn't converted me 100% yet, but she gets closer every day. You name it, it's from Ohio. Even on TV shows, whether it's the main character or the suspect or the good guy, someone has either recently been to, grew up in, lived in, went to school in, you named it, Ohio. As much as it kills me to say it, Ohio truely is the "Heart Of It All." But I'll say it again, GO BLUE!!!!!!

We will forgive you for the go blue comment especially since the bucks have been beating you guys. Who knows, maybe your wife can turn you scarlet and gray! :lol:
 

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Solstick said:
While it is fun to kid about the midwest and States like Ohio, I'll bet most Americans dont know US history or remember it well enough to realize that among other things, Ohio was the birth place of Presidents, Aviation, the first American in space and most of the Industratial Revolution that makes the great USA the modern world leader it is today.
Ohio also lost the "great Michigan-Ohio War" and had to take Toledo! :lol:
 

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We can't forget the most important Ohio notable...the NFL! Where would football be with out Ohio!
 

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Rogobuck said:
Ohio also lost the "great Michigan-Ohio War" and had to take Toledo! :lol:
First of all I was born in Toledo. :brentil:

Second, I left as soon as I could but good people still live there.

And third, next time around you have to take it back! :lol:
 
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