Pontiac Solstice Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,968 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Not sure where I located these photos. But seems the credits are in the images.

Am wondering why this Sky was converted from LHD to RHD ? Any ideas ?






 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,002 Posts
Not sure where I located these photos. But seems the credits are in the images.

Am wondering why this Sky was converted from LHD to RHD ? Any ideas ?
Most race tracks run clockwise, so the majority of the turns, and especially the high-speed turns, are to the right. Putting the driver on the right side of the car improves cornering in right turns by shifting the center of gravity to the right.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,968 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I see, never thought about that.

I am also surprised that this car would be allowed on a track. Typically production like cars need to have a roof.

What class could, or was, this one in?
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,002 Posts
I don't know about current rules, but roofs were not required when we were racing.

It looks like a drift car. There are no class markings, and the treatment of the hand brake handle is fairly revealing.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,968 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
So also in drifting they would go through the trouble of LHD RHD conversions. Very interesting. Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,782 Posts
I am also surprised that this car would be allowed on a track. Typically production like cars need to have a roof.
I don't get that - it has a full roll cage. I grant you that things have changed since the good old days when far more race cars were open than closed, but I have never heard of any organization banning either form - they just require roll over protection in all of them.

I'm still eligible to run (although in current racing I would need to cage the car as a simple roll bar is only good for vintage).

 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,002 Posts
I don't get that - it has a full roll cage. I grant you that things have changed since the good old days when far more race cars were open than closed, but I have never heard of any organization banning either form - they just require roll over protection in all of them.

I'm still eligible to run (although in current racing I would need to cage the car as a simple roll bar is only good for vintage).

Agreed, although I seem to remember that the presence of a roof changes some requirements: Aren't arm restraints required only for open cars?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,782 Posts
Haven't looked at the regs for awhile, but I think they are required for closed cars too if window nets are not installed (or maybe they made window nets mandatory...?)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,002 Posts
So also in drifting they would go through the trouble of LHD RHD conversions. Very interesting. Thanks.
First, its a SEMA car. There is no limit to what they would do, irrespecive of practicality. But, since drifting events are frequently, or even usually, done on race tracks, the stability advantage is still applicable.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,002 Posts
Haven't looked at the regs for awhile, but I think they are required for closed cars too if window nets are not installed (or maybe they made window nets mandatory...?)
We only ever ran one closed car, and I remember a window net being a requirement. I do not remember arm restraints in that car, but it was a small detail, a long time ago.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,968 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
I have not seen any professional race class with no roof for decades. That is why I am surprised.

For amateurs I only know one, the Caterham Class. But there must be many more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
A lot of sanctioning bodies and insurance companies have been slowly phasing in the "hard top" requirement, particularly for wheel to wheel racing. This includes everyone from the SCCA up to the ACO, FIA, NHRA and Indycar. No matter how well your roll cage is designed and built it doesn't do much good if you flip into sand or gravel. They don't have to be real hard tops, just a few layers of fiberglass or carbon fiber.

Aerodynamics generally improve across the board as well.

Most race tracks run clockwise, so the majority of the turns, and especially the high-speed turns, are to the right. Putting the driver on the right side of the car improves cornering in right turns by shifting the center of gravity to the right.
This is irrelevant. Any car that has had that level of effort put in will be properly corner balanced regardless of where the driver is.

My guess as to the initial question brings us back to this probably being a drift car, and in that it probably has an aftermarket quick-reacting long travel steering rack, probably developed for JDM vehicles. And that's why they moved the steering wheel - to line up with the steering rack.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,002 Posts
........
This is irrelevant. Any car that has had that level of effort put in will be properly corner balanced regardless of where the driver is.
........
You're saying that moving 200-odd pounds three feet laterally in a chassis won't affect stability in a right turn?
I think you need to review your physics.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
320 Posts
Triggered much John?

You should probably go re-read what I posted and you yourself quoted. These physics do not care if there is a 200 lb driver on the right, and 200lbs of ballast, fire suppression, radio, data aq, batteries, etc on the left, or vice versa.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,002 Posts
Triggered much John?

You should probably go re-read what I posted and you yourself quoted. These physics do not care if there is a 200 lb driver on the right, and 200lbs of ballast, fire suppression, radio, data aq, batteries, etc on the left, or vice versa.
Triggered? I'm not sure what you mean.

You obviously don't agree with me, and I may even be wrong, but we saw distinctly improved lap times when we rebuilt a production-class MGB to move the driver to the right. Even with balanced corner weights the significantly higher center of mass of the driver changed the dynamics enough to matter. Or it was all psychological, I'm not sure, but lap times improved.

The MGB, of course, was already fitted with all of the body openings and the hard-points to remount everything. The steering rack we simply inverted, so the job was amazingly simple. It is hard for me to believe that someone would rebuild a Kappa to this extent just to avoid reworking a steering rack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,782 Posts
We had many drivers swap over to RHD on their race cars for our local track (many of which were British at the time, so easy to swap over) with positive results on lap times, so I don't think it is psychological, John.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top