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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I imagine there are some folks here with a track record of watching a new automotive product being born. This is the first time I've watched a car so closely (2 years now), and I'm wondering if anyone has seen this process before, and what implications (if any) that experience may have on this one. Do the car companies generally overstate (ie say delivery is delayed till September and then deliver in july), or are they fairly close to reality? If you've watched this process before, what are your thoughts?
 

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Your avatar may be prophetic. I think I'll have my car in time to go leaf peeping in Vermont. :lol:
 

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If history repeats, expect the Solstice to have some problems during the first one, if not two, years of production.

This isn't a negative against Pontiac, it's a generally accepted fact of life for ANY new car built by ANY car company in ANY car producing country.

No matter how much testing a car company does, it simply does not compare to mass producing the vehicle (i.e. Joe Punchclock working the 9 to 5 shift building cars but thinking about his kid's Little League game that night) and then putting them into consumers' hands for real world, every day driving. Or the fact that what the engineers thought was an acceptable fix turns out to fail after 10k miles.

Think about it, if a problem shows up in 25% (something that would warrant a TSB or recall) of cars what would you say the chances are that Pontiac (or any car company) would have been able to build 100 cars and drive them each 10K miles to see there was a problem and then fix it? They wouldn't. Nobody would. It's the same as software companies releasing products to market knowing they'll have to issue patches later once the problems are fully understood and documented by users.

Until Pontiac has at least two years of production experience with the Solstice under its belt, expect there to be some problems. They're usually minor, but not always.

Consider the Nissan 350Z, a car I really liked but decided against buying until it had a track record. Well, it had some serious problems. The big one is that the 03 and 04 models (and perhaps even 05) chew up the front tires every 5 to 10 K miles - horrible road noise at low speeds. Nissan's solution was to give free tires up to like 25K miles for documented cases. No permanent fix as yet. Also, there were cases where transmissions had to be replaced after a few thousand miles as well as other little issues here and there. So, my decision not to buy was the right one for me.

I fully expect these sorts of issues to crop up with the Solstice.

Just my 2 cents.
 

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Its hard to pinpoint whether production delays could really be expected or not. Actually, I’d probably guess that most new cars generally reach production close to when the automaker anticipates. GM got the Corvette out about when they wanted, and the Mustang hit lots on schedule.

However, the Solstice is a bit more complicated in that it is using some new manufacturing techniques and procedures. With that in mind, I could see a few unexpected delays. Since GM originally anticipated a fall 2005 release anyway, maybe we should have been more prepared for delays.
 

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Seems like there's always a "sweet spot" when a car is sold that it reaches a plateau, which in recent years, has been an engine upgrade. There's always little tweaks on top of that plateau, but that big leap UP is a nice wave to ride, and it happens after the car's been on the market for a coupla years.

Fer instance, when the 4th gen F-body got the LS1, the C5 engine, or when the C5 Z06 got bumped up from 385 BHP to 405 BHP. The Chevy SSR recently got the LS2 and gained almost 100 HP, and new GTO owners must really be enjoying their bump up in power, too.

IMHO, when the Solstice gets the "hot" engine, it'll hop up to the next plateau and reach a terrific sweet spot. I look forward to seeing these cars on the road now, but I'm REALLY looking forward to a Solstice coupe or factory removeable hardtop and a potent powerplant.
 

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Danno said:
I imagine there are some folks here with a track record of watching a new automotive product being born. This is the first time I've watched a car so closely (2 years now), and I'm wondering if anyone has seen this process before, and what implications (if any) that experience may have on this one. Do the car companies generally overstate (ie say delivery is delayed till September and then deliver in july), or are they fairly close to reality? If you've watched this process before, what are your thoughts?
i was born into the trade 74 years ago & i find cars to be just as exciting today as it was when i crawled under the back flap of a tent for a dealer only intro of the Tucker. surfing these forums show that mfgrs are still using
the same tricks of the trade that they always did because there are no mutations of car nuts from one generation to the next. sophistication doesn,t apply to car nuts!
 

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Danno said:
I imagine there are some folks here with a track record of watching a new automotive product being born. This is the first time I've watched a car so closely (2 years now), and I'm wondering if anyone has seen this process before, and what implications (if any) that experience may have on this one. Do the car companies generally overstate (ie say delivery is delayed till September and then deliver in july), or are they fairly close to reality? If you've watched this process before, what are your thoughts?
I pre-ordered a Nissan 350Z the first day they were accepting orders in January 2002. The pre-order period was open for several months (I believe they got over 6,000 pre-orders in all).

Cars started arriving in quanity in August 2002 but not in the sequence that orders were placed. I placed the first order at my dealership but got behind about 10 or 12 cars and took delivery in Sept 2002. I think this was because Nissan built more of the most popular trim levels first (there were 5 trim levels in all). Most of the delays surrounding the 350Z's introduction happened before pre-orders were taken. They postponed the anticipated launch date a couple of times if my memory is correct.
 

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Wow! What a releaf! When I saw the title of this thread, I thought for sure it was going to be someone going on about the Fiero again! Phew! :lol:
 

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AeroDave said:
Wow! What a releaf! When I saw the title of this thread, I thought for sure it was going to be someone going on about the Fiero again! Phew! :lol:
:lol: That was my first reaction too! The actual topic was a relief!
 

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diffrunt said:
i was born into the trade 74 years ago & i find cars to be just as exciting today as it was when i crawled under the back flap of a tent for a dealer only intro of the Tucker. surfing these forums show that mfgrs are still using
the same tricks of the trade that they always did because there are no mutations of car nuts from one generation to the next. sophistication doesn,t apply to car nuts!
One of my favorite cars of all time, and if I had been around at the time would have all the accessories from Preston Tucker, just awaiting the car to put them on.
 

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AeroDave said:
Wow! What a releaf! When I saw the title of this thread, I thought for sure it was going to be someone going on about the Fiero again! Phew! :lol:

Why, what's wrong with the Fiero? ;)
 
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