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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So folks who follow my Cool Kappa Verts For Sale thread know that I try and post Solstices with mostly low-mileage. Along w/the prices being somewhat higher than Solstices of the same year but much higher mileage.

But what I've been noticing these last several months is the amount of Solstices being listed with 100,000 plus miles on them. Some of them look to be in good shape, but the majority of them look to have seen better days (and multiple owners).

So that has me thinking that if a car that is anywhere from nine (06) to 5 (2010) years old now, how many more years will it be before it will become harder and harder to find a nice Kappa in a decade or two?

Because I'm thinking once a car reaches a certain mileage most people will simply send them off to the scrap yard.

Also, eventually these cars are going to begin to rust (can't say I remember reading any posting about rust yet), but its just a matter of time before it starts happening, and being junked out.

Like I said, I'm just wondering what the status of Kappa's will be in 10 or 20 years. Thoughts?
 

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The 'verts will double in value. The coupes will be 100 x their original sale price.

lol - sorry.
 

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I'd think that in 10-20 years, the Kappas for sale will mostly be low mileage examples that have been very well-maintained and will be offered at a price reflecting that premium condition. Most of the daily drivers will be worn out, same as any other car driven regularly for 25-30 years.

There will be some that will have been driven somewhat regularly on nice summer days and rack up 5,000 miles a year, so could be sitting in the 100K mileage range 15 years from now, but my guess is that most will be either collector condition or very tired.
 

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Like any other car that has ever been built, a few will survive us..:thumbs:
We'll be the ones buried before some of these cars are junked..:D
 

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In thirty years I won't know what a Kappa is. :willy::willy::willy: In twenty years I will be hitting posts and walls. In ten years (God willing) I will still be driving and loving my Sol!!!!!
 

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I'd think that in 10-20 years, the Kappas for sale will mostly be low mileage examples that have been very well-maintained and will be offered at a price reflecting that premium condition. Most of the daily drivers will be worn out, same as any other car driven regularly for 25-30 years.

There will be some that will have been driven somewhat regularly on nice summer days and rack up 5,000 miles a year, so could be sitting in the 100K mileage range 15 years from now, but my guess is that most will be either collector condition or very tired.
Mine will be one of those.
 

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This is a very speculative subject, but I'll add my piece. I think a few Solstice/Skys (rare combos like gxp coupe or redline with all red interior) will end up as nice colector's cars with a little value behind them, but that's about it. They aren't widely known about, or widely yearned for like a 1967 Corvette 427 or a MKIV Supra is. Half of the car meets I go to people don't even know what type of engine these cars came with or what year range they were made. There is nothing really iconic about them either. If Pontiac would have built a GXP-R with the LS7 in it, well it'd be pretty iconic for having the LS7 in it. Not to mention, cars are getting better and better every day and unless some new legislation or impending gas crisis happens it's not going to stop. 260 hp out of a turbo 4 will be laughable in another 5-10 years when they will be coming with 400 hp from the factory.

Take the Cobalt SS/TC Sedan for example. The Cobalt SS/TC is the best FWD compact GM has ever made, and it even held the Nurburgring record for a couple of years. The Sedan was only made in 2009, and only about 500 were made. Of those, yellow was the rarest color with only 15 being made. 15! 3 have already been wrecked out leaving only 12 left. A couple of months ago a low mileage, completely stock one came up for sale and the poor guy couldn't get rid of it short of giving it away.

With that being said, I'm still going to take care of mine and enjoy the time I will have owning it. I won't be afraid to take it on a road trip or modify it for fear of reducing its value :lol:. The little value that it might have in 20 years isn't going to be worth missing out on all of the memories I'll make with it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I wasn't talking value as much wondering how many will simply be left. For the vast majority of owners who purchased them as daily drivers and continue to accumulating high miles, I don't see those going anywhere except salvage yards in 5 to 10 years.

Hey, there's a business opportunity for someone to start a desert Kappa graveyard.

For those of us who only put 5k a year (or less) on them I can see a lot of them still be driven (as long as wear & tear parts are still available) in 10 or 20 years.

And I'm sure some people bought them and simply parked them (for whatever reason), so while those may be in good condition cosmetically, would they be able to be driven without a mechanical restoration.

More or less spinning my wheels here because as I said I'm seeing a lot of high mileage Solstices being advertised for sale, and slowly but surely it will become harder (but not impossible) to find one in the color and options wanted. But how many, 5K, 15k, 50K?

Currently, I'm hoping to keep ours for a long time, but as I've said in the past, I've learned to never say never.
 

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They will follow the normal decay rate for a low production, third car owned by car lovers. :grouphug:

Any "modern" car can be maintained and kept running basically indefinately. There are plenty of examples of cars that are 50 years old still running around and being enjoyed.

Same will happen with the Kappa's. Only the numbers may be less as a result of the small production numbers.

Kind of like a 65 Mustang. I see them frequently in the nice weather season.
 

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I agree with Rob. There will still be Kappas tucked away in garages and driven on sunny days. There will be a significant number (as it relates to total production being relatively low) in the hands of people who appreciate that this is really a special vehicle. The story of how this car came to be and the changes that started at GM will take on greater importance. Many of the sports cars of the 50s and 60s were considered small and under-powered but have a significant following today even though in many cases their value has not gone out of sight. IMO there are only a small number of truly outstanding old sports cars. The prices we see today are more about emotion than about great cars. In some cases a replica Cobra is better than an original - but not in price. These special Kappa cars will have a following (even though some will find their way to the bone yard) and more will be modified to become the exceptional cars that GM was unable to make. Just my opinion or maybe my wish.
 

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Sol vs Fiero

I think an excellent study would be values of Fieros. The earliest of which are now over 30 years old. I occasionally see examples in the 100k mile range for $4000 - $5000 and similar GT versions for a couple thousand more. Occasionally I see one advertised in the low teens. But to the OP's question, they are still out there and available.

For no other reason than that the Sol and Fiero filled a similar niche in their times, I'd anticipate a similar survival rate and depreciation.

One caveat: I believe the miles accumulated on the Solstice survivors will be higher because reliability has improved in the past 3 decades. a 10 year old car with 100k miles today is a lot different than a 10 year old car with 100k miles in 1996.
 

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Original Value ? Sales Price ? Why the difference. You mean the 100x is without inflation correction ?

The 100x seems pushing it. As far as I know Ferrari or AC Cobra never even did that in 30 years.
Tongue in cheek there. Stirring up the old "how much will it be worth" debate which is unanswerable until someone actually pays it.

As others have said, I think there will still be Kappas around, just a lot fewer that are in good shape. I don't foresee them being highly "collectible", at least for a very long time.
 

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I think an excellent study would be values of Fieros. The earliest of which are now over 30 years old. I occasionally see examples in the 100k mile range for $4000 - $5000 and similar GT versions for a couple thousand more. Occasionally I see one advertised in the low teens. But to the OP's question, they are still out there and available.
I agree.

I had about 230,000 km on my 1988 Fiero GT. It was worth about a third of what it cost new. It is a well kept highly modded car.

I keep cars long term - had one of my current cars for 45 years. What worries me is getting specialized parts like the various computers 20 years from now......there are already expensive cars, BMWs, that can't be driven because there is no remaining stock of NOS computers.
 

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Good point however the ECM and BCM are shared with a lot of high producton GM vehicles. Because of that I suspect we will be better off long term than BMW which at best is a niche vehicle.
 

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Hopefully.

Don't forget that GM already bought back and wrecked one Solstice because they couldn't provide a part on warranty......(it was an electronic module and there was no supply after the Japanese tidal wave in 2011)
 
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